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RE: XML in .NET - more than just SOAP?

  • From: Joshua Allen <joshuaa@m...>
  • To: xml-dev@l...
  • Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 15:38:06 -0700

role of xml in .net
Yeah, practically everything uses XML in one way or
another now; probably to a much greater degree than
the average person would feel is reasonable.  That
has been the strategic direction of Microsoft for a
very long time.  The first mention I remember where
this strategic direction got "leaked" to the public was
in fall of 97, reported here:
http://www.feedmag.com/html/feedline/98.03pesce/98.03pesce_master.html.

> interoperating with .NET services by exchanging XML 
> "document" data rather
> than RPC calls with representations of proprietary objects 
> encoded in SOAP,

That is what biztalk does.  The messages coming in from
other systems can be synchronous or asynchronous, and
can use practically any transport you like (MQ-Series,
whatever).  Also they do not necessarily have to be SOAP,
since the mapper allows transforms.

> actual content of Office documents (including spreadsheets, 

Not certain.  Office 2000 generates alot of storage
for web-based stuff as XML.  I've done alot just
looking at the XML it creates and playing with it.

> etc.)? What about WebForms; is that an XML technology? 

Yes. Tons of other products are now, too..  Funny I
don't know a place that collects all that info together...


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Champion [mailto:Mike.Champion@s...]
> Sent: Monday, July 24, 2000 1:57 PM
> To: xml-dev@l...
> Subject: XML in .NET - more than just SOAP?
> 
> 
> I didn't get a reply to a previous query, which was buried 
> deep in another
> message, about the role of XML in Microsoft's .NET 
> initiative.  I'm not
> ranting, trying to flame .NET, or questioning C# ...  just 
> trying to figure
> out the answer to one question:
> 
> A typical article on .NET in the trade press says something like
> "Microsoft is basing everything on the Extensible Markup 
> Language" (in this
> case, I'm quoting from 
> http://www.iweek.com/author/redmond.htm)  I've read
> the .NET whitepaper, various PDC presentations, and much 
> punditry about .NET
> and the only XML-related components of .NET I hear about are 
> related to
> SOAP.  Is that all that XML has to contribute to the publicly 
> stated vision
> of .NET, or am I missing something?
> 
> More specifically, is there anything about publishing XML 
> formats for the
> actual content of Office documents (including spreadsheets, 
> PPT slides,
> etc.)? What about WebForms; is that an XML technology? Can 3rd parties
> interoperate with .NET components in any way other than via the
> "intermediate language" and its virtual machine?  One could imagine
> interoperating with .NET services by exchanging XML 
> "document" data rather
> than RPC calls with representations of proprietary objects 
> encoded in SOAP,
> but I'm not finding any direct references to this.
> 
> Thanks for any help answering this.
> 

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