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Re: Behavior of document() Function with Empty String

Subject: Re: Behavior of document() Function with Empty String
From: "Roger L. Cauvin" <roger@xxxxxxxxxx>
Date: Mon, 18 Dec 2006 09:45:03 -0600
Re:  Behavior of document() Function with Empty String
> In a particular project of us, all stylesheets from a
> stylesheet library are located in a certain directory
> structure, deeper nested than the input/output sources
> location. To get easy access to the paths of input/output
> and for all stylesheets to "see" the same directory 
> structure, all those stylesheets have an xml:base
> instruction of "../..". This has the (uncanny) side benefit
> of effectively disabling the call to document('').

My project involves a Java web application and a Java 5.0 application that
share the same directory structure.  Unfortunately, the parser in the web
application interprets the document() function differently than the parser
in the standalone application.  I suppose the base paths are different.
Unfortunately, in neither case does document('') refer to the stylesheet
that makes the call.

I can't figure out how to work around this problem without hardcoding
absolute paths or having two sets of stylesheets with different relative
paths.

--
Roger L. Cauvin
r o g e r @ c a u v i n . o r g
http://cauvin.blogspot.com

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